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Arts University Plymouth opens its doors to Alma Yard

Arts University Plymouth welcomed a group of working creatives from Plymouth’s Alma Yard in a pilot venture that will see visiting professionals gain access to the world class facilities on offer in the UK’s newest arts university.

Arts University Plymouth recently welcomed a group of working creatives from Plymouth’s Alma Yard in a pilot venture that will see visiting professionals gain access to our industry-leading resources and facilities.

Alma Yard is the latest addition to Eat Work Art, a leading organisation that transforms disused buildings into workspaces for independent creative communities to grow. Eat Work Art already has four sites in London, Hackney Downs Studios and Netil house in East and Camberwell House and Old Paradise Yard in South, bringing together a community of like-minded individuals who champion innovation and collaboration.

The visit from Alma Yard representatives forms part of Arts University Plymouth’s most recent tranche of Knowledge Exchange projects, partnering academic staff and researchers with external partners and communities to exchange ideas, evidence and expertise. Kate Pierce, Devon Manager of Eat Work Art, said the visit left the residents, 'inspired and dedicated to working collaboratively on this offer as the benefits for their personal and professional development are vast."

JOURNAL Alma Yard residents are shown the dye lab
Matt Holmes from Fab Lab Plymouth is shown talking to Alm Yard residents
Alma Yard residents are shown around AUP facilities

Three images showing Alma Yard residents being shown around Arts University Plymouth's facilities, including FabLab Plymouth, Dye Studio and textiles workshop

Previously a rope factory in the 1800s, Alma Yard in the heart of the East End of Plymouth has been transformed into a busy community of makers and independent businesses. The group who visits Arts University Plymouth came from a wide range of creative disciplines, including printmakers, digital artists and bookbinders. Over the coming months they will explore our workshops and studios as part of an open-access programme that is designed to upskill and diversify their creative knowledge.

“Having professionals using our facilities alongside our student community creates a fantastic opportunity for both parties,” explained our Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Academic), Professor Stephen Felmingham. “This creative exchange supports the local economy and strengthens our ties with nearby artistic communities. With students and local professionals working side-by-side in our workshops, we foster an environment where both parties can gain inspiration from each other's practices.”